Teaching Science Writing – Learning by Doing and Not by Listening

by Sonia Travaglini, College of Engineering (Home Department: Mechanical Engineering) Teaching Effectiveness Award Essay, 2018 Working to support the Masters of Engineering capstone projects, my hardest challenge was teaching students to communicate the value and significance of their highly technical work. Students had to learn science writing; how to use Continue Reading >>

Constructing Live Knowledge from Dead Civilizations

by Eduardo A. Escobar, Near Eastern Studies Recipient of the Teagle Foundation Award for Excellence in Enhancing Student Learning, 2016 Related Teaching Effectiveness Award Essay: Live Digital Translation for Dead Languages Benno Landsberger, one of the founders of modern Cuneiform Studies, believed that to examine a cuneiform tablet from ancient Continue Reading >>

Learning from the Periphery: Collaboration and the Uses of History

by Jesse Cordes Selbin, English Recipient of the Teagle Foundation Award for Excellence in Enhancing Student Learning, 2014 Related Teaching Effectiveness Award essay: Empowered Learning: History, Collaboratively When I designed a collaborative project for my Reading and Composition course last year, my primary goal was to increase participation. Having observed Continue Reading >>

How Research on Student Learning Explains the Effectiveness of Empirically Driven Classroom Activities

by Elise Piazza, Vision Science Recipient of the Teagle Foundation Award for Excellence in Enhancing Student Learning, 2014 Related Teaching Effectiveness Award essay: Achieving Widespread Participation through Evidence-Based Classroom Discourse As a GSI for Introduction to Cognitive Science, I developed several empirically driven activities to increase student participation by engaging Continue Reading >>

The Tipping Point: Encouraging Inclusive Participation Through Productive Failure in a Highly Diverse Student Setting

by Sandile Hlatshwayo, Economics
There are several benefits to this warm-up approach. Primarily… students who must first attempt to solve problems with very little instruction tend to learn the concepts better once they are given formal instruction. Second, students experience less fear over offering incorrect answers as making public errors becomes a normalized part of the classroom experience. Finally, and centrally, students that tend to be non-participators participate…

Learning: Theory and Research

Here you will find brief accounts of leading theories and recent research about how students learn. With a research-based understanding of how students learn, you will be better able to focus your teaching efforts.